Loading...
  [ LOGIN/REGISTER ]   [ MY ACCOUNT ] Items in the shopping cart: 0    Current total: $0.00
   
Left space
 
<br>Neil Young - Harvest<p>Our Shootout Winner in 2018</p>




Neil Young - Harvest

Our Shootout Winner in 2018


A distinguished member of the Better Records Rock and Pop Hall of Fame since 2008.

Let's take a moment to acknowledge the string of superb studio albums Neil released from 1970 to 1976. Just look at these titles: After The Gold Rush, Harvest, On The Beach, Tonight's The Night, and Zuma.

I can't think of anyone else besides Zeppelin (first five titles) and The Beatles (you pick 'em!) who put out this many killer albums consecutively. We consider each of those albums a work of profound creativity, and we can proudly claim to have found copies of each with the sonic credentials to bring these masterpieces to life.

More Neil Young


Sku # : youngharve_2018
Manufacturer : Reprise LP
Qty
:


We also suggest

Rock & Pop Top 100

Our Rock and Pop Top 100 List


Product Detail


When you have this kind of open, extended top end, the grit, grain and edge just disappears, leaving you with a clear, Tubey Magical sound that's miles ahead of anything you have ever heard (or we give you your money back).

What outstanding Harvest sides have to offer is not hard to hear:

  • The biggest, most immediate staging in the largest acoustic space
  • The most Tubey Magic, without which you have almost nothing. CDs give you clean and clear. Only the best vintage vinyl pressings offer the kind of Tubey Magic that was on the tapes in 1972
  • Tight, note-like, rich, full-bodied bass, with the correct amount of weight down low
  • Natural tonality in the midrange -- with all the instruments -- piano; electric, acoustic and pedal steel guitars; bass and drums having the correct timbre
  • Transparency and resolution, critical to hearing into the three-dimensional studio space
  • No doubt there's more but we hope that should do for now. Playing the record is the only way to hear all of the qualities we discuss above, and playing the best pressings against a pile of other copies under rigorously controlled conditions is the only way to find a pressing that sounds as good as this one does.

    Heavy Demand and Not Much Supply

    Harvest is undeniably one of the most beloved albums in all of classic rock. We get letters all the time from customers hoping to get their hands on Hot Stamper copies, but we'll never have the supply to keep up with the demand. It's a tough nut to crack, because a Hot Stamper Harvest has to get so many things right -- the lovely pedal steel guitar on Out On The Weekend, the London Symphony Orchestra on A Man Needs A Maid and There's A World, Neil's grungy electric guitar on Alabama, and so much more.

    Many copies we played would work for the heavy songs and then fall behind on the softer numbers. Others had gorgeous sound on the country-tinged numbers but couldn't deliver any whomp for the rockers. Only a select group of copies could hold their own in all of the styles and engage us from start to finish; we're pleased to present those exceptional pressings as the Hot Stamper copies of Harvest that so many of you have been begging for.

    Finding a reasonably quiet, unscratched pressing with top sound is harder for Harvest than any other Neil Young album from this period. Only his first album with the original mix is more difficult to find in audiophile playing condition. (Never heard a bad one but I sure have heard a lot of noisy ones.)

    Learning the Record

    For our Harvest shootout we had at our disposal a variety of pressings we thought should have the potential for Hot Stamper sound. We cleaned them carefully, then unplugged everything in the house we could, warmed up the system, Talisman'd it, found the right VTA for our Triplanar arm (by ear of course) and proceeded to spend the next hour or so playing copy after copy on side one, after which we repeated the process for sides two, three and four.

    If you have five or ten copies of a record and play them over and over against each other, the process itself teaches you what's right and what's wrong with the sound of the album. Once your ears are completely tuned to what the best pressings do well that the other pressings do not do as well, using a few carefully chosen passages of music, it quickly becomes obvious how well a given copy can reproduce those passages. You'll hear what's better and worse -- right and wrong would be another way of putting it -- about the sound.

    This approach is simplicity itself. First you go deep into the sound. There you find a critically important passage in the music, one which most copies struggle -- or fail -- to reproduce as well as the best. Now, with the hard-won knowledge of precisely what to listen for, you are perfectly positioned to critique any and all pressings that come your way.

    It may be a lot of work but it sure ain't rocket science, and we never pretended it was. Just the opposite: from day one we've explained step by step precisely how to go about finding the Hot Stampers in your own collection.

    Do It Again

    As your stereo and room improve, as you take advantage of new cleaning technologies, as you find new and interesting pressings to evaluate, you may even be inclined to do the shootout all over again, to find the hidden gem, the killer copy that blows away what you thought was the best.

    You can't find it by looking at it. You have to clean it and play it, and always against other pressings of the same album. There is no other way to go about it if you want to be successful in your hunt for the Ultimate Pressing.

    For the more popular records on the site such as the Beatles titles we have easily done more than twenty, maybe even as many as thirty to forty shootouts.

    And very likely learned something new from every one.

    Right right-line
      | NEW TO THE SITE? | ¬†CONTACT US ¬† |