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<br>Jimmy Smith - Got My Mojo Workin’<p>Reviewed in 2010</p>




Jimmy Smith - Got My Mojo Workin’

Reviewed in 2010


A distinguished member of the Better Records Jazz Hall of Fame.

Verve LP with RVG Stampers and very good sound. This album has that analog richness, warmth and smoothness that we prize so highly here at Better Records. Jimmy does some pop tunes, some Ellington and more on this one, which has a real funky feel to it, with Jimmy really getting into it and grunting along with the music in places.

More Jimmy Smith / More Oliver Nelson


Sku # : smithgotmy_2010
Manufacturer : Verve LP
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This copy (especially on side one) was just plain bigger and richer and tubier, as well as more dynamic than the others we played.

What to Listen For (WTLF)

Top end extension is critical to the sound of the best copies. Lots of old records (and new ones) have no real top end; consequently the studio or stage will be missing much of its natural air and space, and instruments will lack the full complement of harmonic information.

In addition, when the top end is lacking, the upper midrange and high frequencies get jammed together -- the highs can't extend up and away from the upper mids. This causes a number of much-too-common problems that we hear in the upper midrange of many of the records we play: congestion, hardness, harshness and squawk. (Painstaking VTA adjustment is absolutely critical if you want your records to play with the least amount of these problems, a subject we discuss in the Commentary section of the site at length.)

Tube smear is common to most pressings from the '50s and '60s. The copies that tend to do the best in a shootout will have little or none, yet are full-bodied, tubey and rich.

Full-bodied sound is especially critical to the horns; any blare, leanness or squawk ruins at least some of the fun, certainly at the louder levels the record should be playing at.

The frequency extremes (on the best copies) are not boosted in any way. When you play this record quietly, the bottom and top will disappear (due to the way the ear handles quieter sounds as described by the Fletcher-Munson curve).

Most records (like most audiophile stereos) are designed to sound correct at moderate levels. Not this album. It wants you to turn it up. Then, and only then, will everything sound completely right musically and tonally from top to bottom.

The Players and Personnel

Alto Saxophone – Phil Woods
Baritone Saxophone – Jerome Richardson
Bass – Ron Carter
Drums – Grady Tate
Guitar – Kenny Burrell
Tenor Saxophone, Flute – Romeo Penque
Trumpet – Ernie Royal

Producer – Creed Taylor
Engineer - Rudy Van Gelder
Director Of Engineering– Val Valentin

Right right-line
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