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<br>Stan Getz - Getz Au Go Go</i><p> Critical Listening Exercise</p>




Stan Getz - Getz Au Go Go

Critical Listening Exercise


Another in our series of Home Audio Exercises.

This album is useful as a test disc. The third track on side 2, The Telephone Song, has a breathy vocal by Astrud, soon followed by Getz's saxophone solo. If those two elements in the recording are in balance, your system is working, tonally anyway.

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Sku # : getz_getza_test
Manufacturer : Verve LP
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Our Favorite Engineers (A Continuing Series)

Rudy Van Gelder


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Presenting another entry in our extensive Listening in Depth series.

Track Commentary

Side One

Corcovado (Quiet Nights Of Quiet Stars)

On the best copies the voice is perfection. The horn is always a bit hard sounding on this track though.

It Might As Well Be Spring

The best copies are warm, rich and sweet here, with much better sound for Getz's sax. This track has some of the tubiest magic you will find on the album.

Eu E Voce (Me and You)
Summertime

This one has real dynamics -- the playing and the sound are lively, but somehow still cool...

Nix-Quix-Flix

Side Two

Only Trust Your Heart
The Singing Song
The Telephone Song

The best song on side two, certainly the most fun, and a wonderful test track as mentioned earlier.

One Note Samba
Here's That Rainy Day

This is one of Rudy Van Gelder's greatest recordings. I think it's as good as it is because he was out of his studio (mostly) and had to revert to Recording 101, where you set up some good mics and get the thing on tape as correctly as you can. There's hardly a trace of his normal compression and bad EQ on this album. (The sax is problematical in places but most everyone else is right on the money.)

Cool Jazz Is Right

I've gotten more enjoyment out of this Getz album than any other, including those that are much more famous. This one is (mostly) live in a nightclub and it immediately puts you in the right mood to hear this kind of jazz.

Listening to side one I'm struck with the idea that this is the coolest jazz record of cool jazz ever recorded. Getz's take on Summertime is a perfect example of his "feel" during these sessions. His playing is pure emotion; every note seems to come directly from his heart.

What really sets these performances apart is the relaxed quality of the playing. He seems to be almost nonchalant, but it's not a bored or disinterested sound he's making. It's more of a man completely comfortable in this live setting, surrounded by like-minded musicians, all communicating the same vibe. Perhaps they all got hold of some really good grass that day; that's the feeling one gets from their playing. There's a certain euphoria that seems to be part of the music. This is definitely one of those albums to get lost in.

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