Loading...
  [ LOGIN/REGISTER ]   [ MY ACCOUNT ] Items in the shopping cart: 0    Current total: $0.00
   
Left space
 
<br>The Beatles - Let It Be<p>MoFi Reviewed</p>




The Beatles - Let It Be

MoFi Reviewed


Sonic Grade: B or B-

Although I haven't played my copy in quite a while -- it might have been as far back as 2007 or 2008 if memory serves -- I recall that it struck me as one of their better titles.

All things considered, it's actually pretty good, assuming your copy sounds like mine (an assumption we really can't make of course -- no two records sound the same -- but for the purposes of this review we're going to assume it anyway). I would give it a "B" or "B-". It can't hold a candle to the real thing, but at least MoFi didn't ruin it like they did with so many of the other Beatles albums.

More on Let It Be


Sku # : beatlletit_mfsl
Manufacturer : Mobile Fidelity
Qty
:


We also suggest

Click to Detail

Site Overview


Hot!

A Frequently Asked Question

What makes you guys think you know it all?


Click to Detail

Our Playback System ...

And Why You Shouldn’t Care


Product Detail


Another Mobile Fidelity Pressing reviewed. Our Audiophile Scorecard has plenty more where this one came from.

The most serious fault of the typical Half-Speed Mastered LP is not incorrect tonality or poor bass definition, although you will have a hard time finding one that doesn't suffer from both.

It's Dead As A Doornail sound, plain and simple, a subject we discuss in greater depth here.

And most Heavy Vinyl pressings coming down the pike these days are as guilty of this sin as their audiophile forerunners from the '70s and '80s. The average Heavy Vinyl LP I throw on my turntable sounds like it's playing in another room. What audiophile in his right mind could possibly find that quality appealing? But there are scores of companies turning out this crap; somebody must be buying it.


Having critically auditioned a pile of Let It Be pressings, it's abundantly clear to us that our stereo system just plain loves this record. Let's talk about why we think that might be.

Our system is fast, accurate and uncolored. We like to think of our speakers as the audiophile equivalent of studio monitors, showing us to the best of their ability exactly what is on the record, no more and no less.

When we play a modern record, it should sound modern. When we play a Tubey Magical recording such as this, we want to hear all the Tubey Magic, but we don't want to hear more Tubey Magic than what is actually on the record. We don't want to do what some audiophiles like to do, which is to make all their records sound the way they like all their records to sound.

They do that by having their system add in all their favorite colorations. We call that "My-Fi", not "Hi-Fi", and we're having none of it.

If our system were more colored, or slower, or tubier, this record would not sound as good as it does. It's already got plenty of richness, warmth, sweetness and Tubey Magic.

To take an obvious example, playing the average dry and grainy Joe Walsh record on our system is a fairly unpleasant experience. Some added warmth and richness, with maybe some upper-midrange suckout thrown in for good measure, would make it much more enjoyable. But then how would we know which Joe Walsh pressings aren't too dry and grainy for our customers to enjoy?

We discussed some of these issues in another commentary:

Our Approach

We've put literally thousands of hours into our system and room in order to extract the maximum amount of information, musical and otherwise, from the records we play, or as close to the maximum as we can manage. Ours is as big and open as any system in an 18 by 20 by 8 room I've ever heard.

It's also as free from colorations of any kind as we can possibly make it. We want to hear the record in its naked form; not the way we want it to sound, but the way it actually does sound. That way, when you get it home and play it yourself, it should sound very much like we described it.

If too much of the sound we hear is what our stereo is doing, not what the record is doing, how can we know what it will sound like on your system? We try to be as truthful and as critical as we can when describing the records we sell. Too much coloration in the system makes those tasks much more difficult, if not a practical impossibility.

We are convinced that the more time and energy you've put into your stereo over the years, decades even, the more likely it is that you will hear this wonderful record sound the way we heard it. And that will make it one helluva Demo Disc in your home too.

Right right-line
  | NEW TO THE SITE? |  CONTACT US   |