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<br>801 Live <p>It's All About the Bass (Except for that One Time When It Wasn't)</p>




801 Live

It's All About the Bass (Except for that One Time When It Wasn't)


What's especially interesting about this copy is that we went crazy for it even though it did not have the best bass of the copies we played, which, as you will see below, clearly contradicts what we had previously written. We thought that the copies with the best bass had the best everything else too, but that was not what we heard this time around.

THIS copy got the music to work its magic, and it did it with most, but not all, of the bass of the best. Not sure how to explain it. Rules were made to be broken maybe?

More Phil Manzanera & Roxy Music


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801 Live ranks near the top of the list of my All Time Favorite Albums -- a Desert Island Disc if ever there was such a thing. I stumbled across it more thirty years ago and I've loved it ever since. (It started when a college buddy played me the wildly original Tomorrow Never Knows from the album and asked me to name the tune. Eno's take is so different from The Beatles version that I confess it took me an embarrassingly long while to catch on.)

Major Audiophile Pitfall Number One

Sometime in 2006 I noted on the site that I had finally figured out how to tell the good pressings from the not-so-good ones. I had been focussing on the wrong things in the shootouts I had done over the last few years, and in that I have the feeling I was not alone. This seems to be a fairly common Major Audiophile Pitfall that we all get stuck in on occassion.

In this case I was trying to find a more transparent copy, one with more shimmer to the cymbals and air around the instruments. The first track is a little opaque and I wanted to be able to hear into the music better. I had tried many import and domestic copies, but none of them seemed to have the qualities I was looking for. They all sounded different, but I could not for the life of me find one that clearly sounded right.

That was my mistake. This album isn't about clarity. It's about the POWER OF ROCK AND ROLL. It's about the sound of a live band in concert, a band with one of the most phenomenal rhythm sections ever captured on tape. The most phenomenal one I've ever heard, that's for sure.

Big Bass Is Key (But Not the Only Key)

Doing the shootout I realized what separates the men from the boys on this LP: bass. The copies with the most powerful, deepest bass, the stuff under 50 cycles, most often get everything else right too. The bass is the foundation to the sound, and without it the guitars and voices don't sound right. They're just too thin. They need body, and body comes from bass.

The "bassy" copies are more dynamic too. They communicate the power of the music in a way that the leaner copies simply do not. With the leaner copies it's a good album. With the bassy copies YOU ARE THERE.

(Assuming you play this record at the levels necessary for the suspension of disbelief to take hold, i.e., LOUD. The Legacy Focus' speakers I currently use to audition records have three 12" woofers that really pump it out at the low end, at high levels, with no audible distortion. It's one of the reasons they're used in recording studios for monitors.)

I went down the wrong road because I got caught up in the details and missed the essence of the sound. Are you a detail freak? Is that where the music is -- in the details? For audiophiles that's Pitfall Number One. Brighter ain't necessarily better; most of the time it's just brighter, and, truth be told, worse. (Played an XRCD lately?)

An Amendment to the Comments Above

Of course there's more to the story than just good bass or dynamics, although for this album they are sine qua non as discussed above. Our Super Tweeters as well as new and improved room treatments, in concert with our three pairs of Hallographs, have made a huge difference in the area of top end extension.

So now I would like to amend my previous comments in order to say that Top End Extension plays a crucial role in determining which copies truly soar above the others. The typically good-sounding imports have very little tape hiss. The Hot Stampers have clearly audible hiss that sounds just right. On some tracks, as soon as you drop the needle and hear the tape hiss sound right, you know you have a pretty darn good copy. The soundstage opens up, complete with tons of depth, transparency, and wall to wall sound floating free from the speakers. If the bass is there, and it's not sloppy or congested, you, my friend, have what we call a Hot Stamper. All you have to do now is sit back and let the cinerama sound wrap itself around you. You are in for a treat!


If you are in the market for a Hot Stamper pressing, you may be in luck. Click here to see what we currently have on hand.


Further Reading

...along these lines can be found below.

You can find your very own Hot Stamper pressings by using the techniques we lay out in Hot Stamper Shootouts -- The Four Pillars of Success.

We have 50+ Audio Exercises you can try at home for fun and profit.

We have a section for Audio Advice of all kinds.

And finally we'll throw in this old warhorse discussing How to Become an Expert Listener, subtitled Hard Work and Challenges Can Really Pay Off.

Because in audio, much like the rest of life, hard work and challenges really do pay off.

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